New discovery by scientists: Blindness may become a thing of the past


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US scientists have developed an electric eye that can precisely distinguish colors and provide fine detail compared to previous devices. The technology is believed to help visually impaired people in the future.

Scientists have developed a small electric eye that is designed for use by microbots and can help people who are blind.

Georgia State University researchers in the U.S. created the device using a new vertical stacking system. This allowed the scale to be reduced and worked at micro-levels.

Led by associate physics professor Sidong Lei, their goal is to create a micro-sized camera that can operate as the eyes of small robots, accessible to humans and larger-scale boats.

It will be a micro-scale robotic camera, using synthetic methods to mimic biochemical processes that allow humans to see.

Prof. Lei also commented, “We have improved color recognition when compared to previous generations of devices of the same size. This is one of the most critical functions of vision.” The ultimate goal of our research is to develop a micro-scale camera for micro-robots that have the potential to enter narrow spaces with existing tools and open up new horizons in areas such as medical diagnosis, environmental research, production, archeology, and more.”

Lei and his team explained that the vertical color detection structure provides precise color recognition which can simplify the design of the optical lens system. Ningxin Li, a graduate student who is part of the research team, said the latest advances in technology have made new designs possible.

Li continued: “The new functionality of our image sensor architecture depends on the rapid progress of semiconductor materials in recent years. Compared to traditional semiconductors such as silicon, we can precisely control the tape structure, thickness, and other critical parameters of new materials to detect the colors of red, green, and blue.”

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On the other hand, we filed a patent for the new technology with the Technology Transfer and Commercialization Office of the State of T Georgia (OTTC). “This technology has the potential to overcome a number of significant disadvantages that exist with existing sensors. As nanotechnology advances and devices become more compact, these smaller, highly precise color sensors will become incredibly useful,” explained Dr. Stefan Spindler, CEO of Industrial at Schaeffler AG.

At the same time, researchers highlighted that the discovery may one day lead to developments that help the visually impaired. Li says, “This technology is essential for the development of biomimetic electronic eyes and also other neuromorphic prosthetic devices. High-quality color detection and image recognition can bring new color element detection possibilities for the future blind.”

All the findings were published in the scientific journal ACS Nano.


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