Israel voters at the polls for the fourth time in 2 years


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Israel voters at the polls for the fourth time in 2 years

In Israel, voters began voting in early elections for the fourth time in two years.

More than 6.3 million voters in Israel went to the polls to elect lawmakers to enter the 120-seat parliament in an election contested by 37 parties.

Voting will continue until 22.00, starting at 07.00 local time, in the election where additional measures have been taken due to the new type of coronavirus (Covid-19) outbreak.

In the election, where inconclusive results are expected tomorrow, one wonders whether the Covid-19 pandemic will affect turnout at the ballot box.

Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu, who is still on corruption charges, is aiming to retain his seat by winning an election crucial to his political future.

According to Israeli media opinion polls, 13 parties are projected to enter the 120-seat parliament in a country where the electoral threshold is 3.25 percent.

Netanyahu’s Likud party will win the election with at least 30 deputies, while its rival Yair Lapid-led Future Party will come in second with 18.

Opinion polls suggest that no party will reach the 61 seats needed to govern alone, so a new coalition government awaits Israel.

Right-wing parties expected to back Netanyahu could win 60 MPs, one seat short of the number needed to form a coalition government.

It is said that it is almost impossible for netanyahu’s opponents to form a coalition government.

Because there are problems that seem difficult to solve, such as who will be prime minister in the coalition government of opposition figures and the Common Arab List Bloc, a coalition of parties representing Palestinians who are Israeli citizens.

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Gideon Saar, leader of the New Hope Party, and Naftali Bennett, leader of the Yamina Party, are known to be unappeasive to Yair Lapid’s prime ministership.

Even if Saar and Bennett accept Lapid as prime minister, the joint Arab List Bloc would need support to form this coalition government.

Saar and Bennett, who are prominent in their far-right views, are certain not to be part of a coalition backed by the Common Arab List Bloc.


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