How Much Ice the World Loses Each Year: 1.2 Trillion Tons


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A new study has found that the world’s glacial melting rate is occurring much faster than predicted. According to this, the world loses 1.2 trillion tons of ice per year.

The world is currently grappling with the COVID-19 pandemic, and with the vaccines being developed and the vaccine work still underway, an important step has been taken in the fight against the pandemic. However, larger than COVID-19, a much more important danger that we cannot deal with without mass struggles is at our door: climate change.


Global warming and climate change are the biggest threats to life on Earth. Moreover, we may be underestimating this danger. Climate change has a much more impact on Earth’s glaciers than predicted, according to a new study.

The melting rate of glaciers is higher than thought

How Much Ice the World Loses Each Year 1.2 Trillion Tons
How Much Ice the World Loses Each Year: 1.2 Trillion Tons

According to a new report published in The Cryosphere, the rate at which glaciers melt has reached the equivalent of the intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change’s worst-case scenario. Thomas Slater, lead author of the study, said the impact of water level rise on coastal residents this century would be quite high.


About 28 trillion tons of ice disappeared between 1994 and 2017. Two-thirds of this was caused by the temperature in the atmosphere and the remaining third by the rising sea temperature. It is estimated that 0.8 trillion tons of ice melted annually in the 1990s, but by 2017 this amount had increased to 1.2 trillion tons per year. It means that ice losses during this period raised the global sea level by 35 mm.


The rate of ice melting is predicted to continue to accelerate in the near future. A NASA study in Greenland found that 74 large glaciers in the region were weakening. A study published in Science Advances said scientists had failed to calculate the bottoming off of the oceans to glaciers.

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NASA glacial researcher Eric Rignot called it cutting off feet instead of melting the entire body. “Unlike the melting that occurs through the whole body, when the feet melt, the whole body falls down. This is an example of how the current projections are conservative.”


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